Cellphone use in the heat of protests

At the ongoing protests in Egypt, journalists and photographers have worked in dangerous conditions in order to show the rest of the world what is going on. One of these are the Reuters photographer Amr Abdallah Dalsh that took this photo. The photo highlights many interesting details.

In the cropped-photo below, I have highlighted two such details where people in the background are using their cellphones to document and perhaps even broadcast the situation.

It is reasonable to believe that, the activists use of cellphones to capture and even live-broadcast visual media will be a fundamental and widespread activity in similar future events. Social media such as Twitter for text, Flickr for photos and Bambuser for live video has become and will continue to be important tools for live reporting.
There are some interesting challenges in how to make use of professional news organizations visual media in combination with photos and video from activists in future crisis information systems.
It would be exciting to run some form of workshop with an unfocused group of Swedish news agencies together with activists and explore this dynamic design space.

One thought on “Cellphone use in the heat of protests

  1. hi! Uploading documented incidents of a crisis to social media networks requires internet connection. However, during the revolution in Egypt the Internet was shut down by their president. In this context this article [1] appeared in the WIRED is interesting , as it reports about the US military being able to provide Internet access to countries that have been cut off from the rest of the world.[1] U.S. Has Secret Tools to Force Internet on Dictators, http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/02/secret-tools-force-net/

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